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LETTER: Just about everyone supports mining

Timberjay 

If you drive a car, use a computer or cell phone, have plumbing in your house, watch TV, wear jewelry, cook with metal pans, own a lawn chair, have glass in your windows, have a furnace, air conditioner or wood stove, paddle a canoe, use electricity or use a refrigerator, you support mining.

If you wear glasses, have had a tetanus shot, been x-rayed at the dentist, immunized your dog or cat, gone fishing or own a camping cook set, you have supported mining.

Even the Ely Field Naturalists support mining when they bring those binoculars and cameras on their outings. Heck, the tourist industry supports mining (note those metal chain link fences at the bear and wolf centers) and in fact this industry could not survive without some sort of mining. In other words, mining supports tourism.

In her editorial last week Nancy Jo Tubbs complains about the brevity of the message on the signs that have been sprouting up like mushrooms around the area. She thinks they should be more specific. She then goes on to suggest other statements which would suit her better.

She seems to suggest that those who display these signs do not care about the environment. I disagree. I don’t know of anyone in support of the new mining ventures who doesn’t want these projects to be done in an environmentally sound way and while the signs have simple statements, they are most likely in response to the sled dog circus in St. Paul last winter rather than an affront to tourism.

Now that it has been proven that the petitions delivered to the capitol were, first of all, 2,000 less than claimed and also that over 70 percent of those signing the petition were not from “northern Minnesota” as was proclaimed by Steve Morse from the Minnesota Environmental Partnership, perhaps someone decided it was time to show who actually does support mining in this area.

The “we support mining” signs say just enough. If you don’t agree with them, you are kidding yourself, because without mining you wouldn’t be reading this letter.

Mary Tome

Ely, Minn.